Book Review: The Spook’s Slither by Joseph Delaney

Spook’s Slither is the 11th book in Joseph Delaney’s Wardstone Chronicles. It follows a Haizda Mage named Slither.

Slither’s Tale does not particularly have a strong connection to the on going series other than it features one of the main characters in the form of Grimalkin. Nonetheless I find this a swift and a very entertaining read. It features monsters, assassins, mages and a whole lot amount of action involving decapitations, blood drinking and other nasty doings. All of it of course makes up a very solid journey overall.

The book is told in to two different perspectives. One is told by the protagonist Slither and the other in the view of Nessa. Slither is not the usual hero that we get. In fact we can tell that he is a monster through and through he will kill, drink blood, decapitate and he loves a good competition. Bounded by a trade he is forced to take care of 3 human girls one of which is Nessa, the other perspective in the book. Nessa brings the humanity in the book, that human perspective that will give a humanistic reaction to monsters and their doings. This, in return gives a perfect blend in the book, switching from one perspective to another when needed.

Another factor to take in to the book is Grimalkin. To me, I feel like Grimalkin was needed in the book. Her personality and charisma brings lively tone and gives the readers that extra nudge to keep them on reading.

To conclude, Delaney, successfully expanded the universe the original series is in. It is indeed a great expansion, but I feel like this should have been written after the main story arc has been finished. I can also confidently say that loyal readers can skip this book and go straight to book 12 after book 10 and they would not miss anything from the main arc. However this should be a satisfying read to readers who would want to take a break from the main story.

Graphic Novel Review: Dr Strange: The Oath By Brian K. Vaughn and Marcos Martin

Critically wounded by a gunshot, Dr Strange is rushed into the clinic of Night Nurse, a practitioner that mostly tends super heroes. Prior to the events that occurred, we find out that, Dr Strange was robbed and a mystical Elixir has been taken away from him, an Elixir that has the ability to cure cancer.

This is my first time reading a Dr Strange run, although I know a few amount of information about the superhero, I haven’t had the chance to completely dwell into his character until now. Reading The Oath, I found myself thoroughly enjoying the story as it develops. However rather linear, the story was incredibly fun to follow.

The Oath is not an origin story but it does give the readers enough amount of origin story to know about Stephen Strange’s past and how he became the supreme sorcerer. The artwork is undeniably amazing and the dialogue is well written. It allows the first time readers to read into the character of Stephen Strange.

In The Oath, Stephen Strange is also accompanied by Night Nurse and Wong. Both characters are written nicely with enough emphasis on both of them to make the readers care about their character. The antagonist is someone I truly liked as he is not your typical bad guy but rather a complex character who is conflicted between what is right or wrong.

To sum up The Oath is a great series for both long time fans and new readers who are trying to get into Dr Strange. With an engrossing story and a climax that was extremely well done, it is an entertaining read that will no doubt make the reader want to read more of Dr Strange.

Book Review: Wards of Faerie by Terry Brooks

Wards of Faerie is one of those books that may captivate you looking at it’s cover. If you’re a big fan of the fantasy genre and you saw this at a book store. Without a doubt it will get your attention. However an awesome cover does not usually mean an awesome book. Thus the saying “don’t judge a book by it’s cover”.

Wards of Faerie starts of in a promising way. Showing you an old diary entries about a romantic story between two lovers. Of course as most cliches go, there were complications in their relationships and simply put the girl’s parents forbids her from seeing the boy. In retaliation the boy stole five out of six Elfstones and ran away. However he left a note that says she can use the last Elfstone to find him. Fast forward to the current setting of the book, An elf named Aphenglow discovers these entries and used it to help find the five remaining Elfstones.

That itself should tell you more about this book than it needed to. You’ve got the different races, forbidden romance, and a quest that can immensely affect each and everyone in the world of the book. It is a very generic set up for a fantasy and unfortunately you probably have seen this in earlier books or even in video games. Yes a party is needed for the quest and yes the bad guys are also looking for the said Elfstones. There are not that many aspects in this book that is unique. The story is predictable and the characters mostly one dimensional. There are some that may get your attention here and there and the action sequences are well written. However even that does not save the book from it’s dull premise.

To conclude, it will be liked for people who don’t mind a good fantasy book. The world is very Tolkien like, with elves, orcs, humans, dwarves and of course dragon. That said, it is very generic and people who are looking for a more enthralling form of fantasy would most likely not see it here.

Book Review: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

 

Having watched the first two movies I was curious on how The Hobbit(book) actually played out, specially with the cliffhanger ending of the movie, I just had to read the book to find out the ending. That said, this review will be purely based on what I felt about the book and there will be no movie references for that matter.

The Hobbit was not as a page turner as I expected it to be. It starts quite slow and never really picks up until the third act. In between though, delivers some really enthralling chapters. Riddles in the Dark, is a marvel to read and the exchange of riddles between Bilbo and Gollum feels like an intense match of tennis and one is equally as witty as the other. The adventures withing the Mirkwood forest also delivers some uncomfortable scenes, the feeling of hopelessness is felt and really makes you emotionally attached to the dwarves and makes you feel their frustration while wandering within the forest.

As the third act begins, it really is a giant snowball rolling swiftly down a hill. The plot turns, shocking character changes and not to mention a dreadful war is at hand. It really is the best part of the book for me and it was handled perfectly.

Overall apart from the slow start, there is nothing bad about this book. It delivers an amazing journey and in terms of Bilbo a great sense of self discovery. It’s an incredible book and all fans of the fantasy genre will undoubtedly love it.